Human Movement Science & Functional Anatomy of the:

Teres Major

by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

By Anatomography - en:Anatomography (setting page of this image), CC BY-SA 2.1 jp, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22783765 By Anatomography - en:Anatomography , CC BY-SA 2.1 jp, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22783765

What’s in a name

  • Teres - of latin origin referring to “round” or “cylindrical” (Wikipedia)
  • Majormajor (adj.) c.1300, from Latin maior (earlier *magjos), irregular comparative of magnus “large, great” (see magnate). (Etymology Online)

By Henry Vandyke Carter - Henry Gray (1918) Anatomy of the Human Body (See "Book" section below)Bartleby.com: Gray's Anatomy, Plate 203, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=307344 By Henry Vandyke Carter - Henry Gray (1918) Anatomy of the Human Body - Bartleby.com: Gray's Anatomy, Plate 203, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=307344

Attachments:

  • Origin: Oval area over the dorsal surfaces of the inferior angle and lower 1/3 of the lateral border of the scapula, and the fibrous septa shared by the infraspinatus and teres minor (8, 11, 21).
  • Insertion: Crest of the lesser tubercle of the humerus (11).  The border of the teres major and latissimus dorsi tendons are joined for a short distance near their attachments on the humerus before splitting to their separate insertions (8).

Relative Location:

The teres major is a superficial muscle originating from an oval shaped origin on the inferior angle and lateral border of the posterior side of the scapula. This origin is abutted inferiorly by fascial slips from the latissimus dorsi on the scapula, and laterally the origin of the teres major is abutted by the broad attachment