Human Movement Science & Functional Anatomy of the:

Latissimus Dorsi

by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, H/FS

By User:Mikael Häggström - Image:Gray409.png, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2892603 By User:Mikael Häggström - Image:Gray409.png, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2892603

What’s in a name

 

Latissimus Dorsi Cadaver - http://www.rvuanatomy.com/uploads/1/3/4/5/13457421/db1a_animated.gif

 

Attachments:

  • Origin: Spinous processes and supraspinous ligament of last six thoracic vertebrae, the caudal end of the most vertical fibers attach to the last three or four ribs - interdigitating with the external obliques, thoracolumbar fascia from the lumbar and sacral vertebrae and posterior 1/3 of the external lip of the iliac crest, and a slip from the inferior angle of the scapula (3, 8, 11).
  • Insertion: Floor of the intertubercular groove of the humerus (3, 11).

(From left to right) PM - Pectoralis major, LHB - Long Head of Biceps, LD - Latissimus dorsi, SHB - Short Head of Biceps, CB - Coracobrachialis, TM Teres Major - http://radsource.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/6A.jpg

Relative Location:

The latissimus dorsi is a large, superficial muscle with a complex origin and peculiar path to its insertion.  As the latissimus dorsi courses superiorly it invests in the inferior angle of the scapula (either directly or through fascial slip), makes up the majority of the posterior wall of the