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Anterior Thigh SA Active Release

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Anterior Thigh SA Active Release is an effective therapy technique designed to target injured and tight soft tissue in the thigh. It involves the practitioner applying specific tension to the soft tissue while performing guided, rhythmic strokes and active releasing movements across the body's range of motion. This technique releases adhesions, tension, and restrictions to restore optimal range of motion, improve mobility, reduce pain, and improve performance.

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Transcript

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This is Brent, President of B2C Fitness,
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and we're talking about active
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self-administered release for the anterior thigh. Now, the muscles that have
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a propensity to develop tightness, trigger points, and adhesions are going to be our
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rectus femoris, and our vastus intermedius, usually attributed to an
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anterior pelvic tilt, or a history of knee pain. I'm have Salvi come out help
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me demonstrate these two exercises. Now, in the last video, we did static release
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for the anterior thigh. We pretty much went right to our rectus femoris trigger
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point, here. In this video we'll go ahead and do the vastus intermedius. Now,
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normally we wouldn't do active release to one, static release to the other. Active
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release is simply a progression from static release. We'd start with our
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static release techniques, get that trigger point to tone down, get that
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tenacity to tone down. Once we've gotten that trigger point to nearly go away,
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then we could start with our active release techniques to bind down that
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adhesive area, floss the muscle through it so that we get some good movement
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back, and improve muscular function. Let me have you go ahead and assume that
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plank position we did it for the static release technique. So as you can see,
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the technique starts out the same. We're in a plank position, Salvi's going to
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roll until she finds the most tender area, this time in the lower part of her
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quad where we would attribute a vastus intermedius adhesion. This technique
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works a little different than the other active release techniques we've done. In
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the previous active release techniques we've done, we've found the most tender
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spot, and then gone just above or below it so that we can then bind down that
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adhesive point, and run the muscle through it. This time, with the rectus
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femoris, we're going to go right on the adhesive point, then has Salvi go ahead
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and bend her knees. That's going to move the most adhesive point just distal, or
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just lower than the foam roll, and then as she slowly lowers her legs, the foam roll
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will bind that adhesive point, and the muscle will be pulled through this
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way. Now, the protocol for active release is very similar to active stretching.
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She's going to do 8 to 15 repetitions, down nice and slow, holding
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for 2 at the bottom, or she's going to keep going until she finds some increase
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in extensibility, some release, some reduction of the discomfort she felt
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when she started this exercise. So, you can start with your static release
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techniques for anterior thigh, being rectus femoris and vastus intermedius, for those
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who have either an anterior pelvic tilt, or history of knee pain, and then you