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Latissimus Dorsi Self-administered Dynamic Release

Latissimus Dorsi Self-administered Dynamic Release is a self-treatment technique that utilizes a series of gentle movements and stretches to release tension and restrictions of the Latissimus Dorsi muscle. When complete, this technique will stretch and lengthen the muscle, helping to restore balance and circulation to the area, and allowing for an improved range of motion and freedom from pain. This technique can be done by yourself in the comfort of your own home and is a safe and effective way to

Transcript

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This is Brent of the Brookbush Institute,
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...blank
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and in this video we are going over
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advanced self-administered release techniques.
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Specifically, dynamic self-administered release
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of the latissimus dorsi.
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I have to thank my friend,
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Dr. Kyle Stull, for showing me this technique at the Trigger Point Performance workshops.
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Im going to have my friend Bryan come out.
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He's going to help me demonstrate.
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He's going to get in a side-lying position,
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just like we've seen that
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latissimus dorsi/teres major foam roll technique.
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I'm going to go ahead and have him grab that orange foam roller.
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For this technique foam rollers tend to work a little bit better
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than smaller softball and massage balls,
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because we want to be able to pin the tissue
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Alright, so you're going to go ahead and get into position, here.
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Alright, so he's side-lying,
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He's going to look for the most tender point
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Which, if we're going after the latissimus dorsi
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In this position, there's a trigger point,
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generally at the inferior angle of the scapula.
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So, if you can palpate the inferior angle of the scapula
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for your patient or client,
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that usually helps them find the position.
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Go ahead and find that tender point for me Bryan.
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There you go... (ya, I'm on it)... Good.
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I'm going to go ahead and have him bend his legs
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make sure he's in a nice, stable position.
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Because I'm going to actually need him to take all the pressure off this arm.
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If he's using this arm to stabilize
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his Lat' will become active,
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and we'll never get a release.
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So I'm going to have him use this hand
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to support his head,
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by having him make a fist,
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and then kind of put it under his neck,
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and he can kind-of lay down "just like that".
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Now, for the fun part.
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The torturous part
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The part that is going to make this go from
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a little bit tender, to maybe a lot a bit tender
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He's going to move just distal
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to the tender point he just found.
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So, scoot that way just a little.
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You want to make sure, that the foam roll is still on the point,
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but, just distal his latissimus dorsi, on this side abutting it.
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He's now going to take this hand,
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Starting here...
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My latissimus dorsi is an extensor
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So to lengthen it
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He's going to take his arm through flexion
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In this sweeping motion
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How'd that feel... (terrible) Terrible?
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Ya, this is definitely one of those techniques
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As, I've mentioned berfore, we're going to start with our static release techniques
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we're are going to help try to desensitize some of that tissue,
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we're going to help get rid of whatever trigger points and tender points are already there
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So, that this isn't quite so bad.
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This is an advanced release technique. We'll progress to this.
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and then, hopefully... Bryan's saying it's terrible...
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but, I know he can handle it.
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Let's try that again.
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He's been doing this a long time, if you tried to do this
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on a novice client I think you'd have some problems.
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I think it would just be too much.
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Too much tenderness; they wouldn't want to get it done.
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Now, remember the goal of these techniques
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is to, pin whatever adhesive tissue has developed
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around these tender points
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This idea that these fascial layers become bound
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So, it's important that we get this movement,
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and then we do this 5, 10 maybe 12 times.
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To try and get that fascial tissue
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to... unbind. To breakdown some of that adhesion, and increase extensibility.
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Now obviously, if I've given Brian this technique,
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I have done an assessment, that gives me an indication
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that his latissimus dorsi, or his shoulder flexion is restricted.
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That could be his overhead squat,
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Maybe his arms fall forward
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Maybe I did some goniomety and found that he had a...
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a limitation in external rotation, or a limitation in flexion.
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And, of course after I've done this technique
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I'm going to re-asses with whatever assessment I used
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to get me to this particular intervention.
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If it didn't do anything to his motion,
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than we can... nix this technique.
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Because, despite the fact that it's tender
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Tenderness is going to happen on anybody you do
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Does it actually contribute to better motion,
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better rehab, and of course... better performance.
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You want to try the other side?
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(Ya) Alright, so Bryan's going to set himself up.
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I'll review this one more time with you guys.
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So notice he's in side lying position.
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He's using his leg's to balance himself,
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so, he's kind-of in that hook-lying position.
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He's gonna find the most tender spot, get just distal to that spot.
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He's using his other hand as a pillow,
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and then... he's slowly getting himself down into flexion
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because he knows what's about to happen.
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Move all these other tools out of the way.
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Alright and extend.
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So, ya, the other way.
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We're going from here, all the way into flexion.
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How does that feel?
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(Not as bad as the other side) Not as bad as the other side?
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(Or, I'm used to the pain) Or, he's used to the pain.
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The torture.... (laughs)
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Alright guys, so once again here's the technique
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Side lying position, find the point, go just distal to that point
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and then use flexion to pull those muscle fibers through...
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any adhesed tissue.
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I hope you guys get great changes in performance.
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I hope you get great changes in motion,
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and improved outcomes.
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I look forward to seeing your comments
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and of course if you have any questions, feel free to leave them.