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Muscular and Fascial System 2: Video #23 of Introduction to Functional Anatomy

This video is a comprehensive introduction to the anatomy of the muscular and fascial systems. It covers the origin and insertion points of the major muscles, how they move and attach, and the role of fascial tissue in stabilizing the body. The video also includes illustrations of different muscle groups, demonstrating how they interact with other tissues and structures. The materialis presented in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step manner and is suitable for learners of all levels.

Transcript

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You guys already know the three rules of
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muscles we talked about it yesterday, but
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the muscular system, all of the muscles that cross a joint are going to play a
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role in joint motion, all of them. Think about that for a second. All of them have
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a role to play. So when we learned all the muscles of the shoulder yesterday, and we
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learned that the pectoralis did this, and the posterior deltoid did that, and the rotator
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cuff did this, realize anytime you move they're all on, doing something. All
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muscles act in multiple planes to concentrically accelerate, isometrically
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stabilize, and eccentricly decelerate motion. Another one of those things for
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you guys to start letting circle in the back of your head, every muscle you can
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think of has its function are those three functions depending on what the
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movement is. Some muscles and this is this is one of the next steps in your
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learning, in your analysis which we started working on yesterday, is to start
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thinking in functional groups. The reason I graph you guys to death is to start
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getting you to think in groups of muscles, not just oh yeah my PEC does
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this, that's great if all you're going to do is be a gym rat. If you're going to be
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more than a gym rat you're going to create some really sophisticated
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routines to push performance forward regardless of the sport, from
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bodybuilding, powerlifting to basketball to football to lacrosse
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whatever it happens to be, you're going to have to think a little bit bigger
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than that. When I say internal rotators of the shoulder, you better be thinking
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more than pectoralis, you guys with me.
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The fascial system, we talked a little bit about what the fascial system does. We
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talked about it a little bit this morning ,we talked about a little bit
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during core, let's talk about how it affects movement. It transmits force from
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one muscle to another, right there's some of these pieces of fascia I told you
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like, we keep talking about this thoracolumbar fascia, it also connects my
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glute to my latissimus dorsi. So it'll help transmit force from lower extremity to upper
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extremity providing I have a nice stable core through this piece of fascia, it'll
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help. It'll restrict motion if it becomes adaptively shortened. So if a fascial
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system becomes tight or bound one layer to another, that's going to affect motion.
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Elastic recoil that you were just talking about the elastic limit right. So
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the elastic limit of fascia is different from the plastic limit, we could get
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really really far on this, but just power movements what you're kind of doing is
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taking fascia into its elastic limit, what do you guys know of elastic bands
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they'll break them if you take them all the way too far, so you can't take them
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too far, that is kind of what happens during a strain right. But if I take it
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to an elastic limit and then I let go what happens? Force is produced right, the
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fascia didn't contract it recoiled. Power training is about matching that to what
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other thing that's going to help you produce force? Concentric contraction of
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muscles, you guys with me there on top of stretch reflex.
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So that's part of how the like, you guys have heard of plyometrics before right,
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it's an eccentric load, stimulate my attic reflex, take fascia into that
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elastic range, and then I consciously concentrically contract and try to match
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those three things. Oh densely invested with proprioceptors. There is a good
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chance that fascia is a sensory organ unto itself. That little thing we just
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did right fascia is densely invested with receptors. I have a little fascial
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hypothesis that these big pieces of fascia like your thoracolumbar fascia,
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your abdominal sheath, your iliotibial band are like nature's motherboard. You guys
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know a little bit about computers right, what does a motherboard do in a computer?
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It holds a lot of vital stuff right so that this information can ping off the
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motherboard and go back and do whatever the computer needs to do. From the way I
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see this fascial research, one of the things that we can start to look at is
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if two muscles connect to the same fascial sheath there might be something
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there about how those receptors within that fascia affect the tone. That's not
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the fake tone that's not how it looks, but the activity level of those two
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muscles and how that's going to affect a motor plan. If you pull on this fascia it
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might tone up this, muscle tone down this muscle which is going to affect force
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production and how we move. Does that make sense? It'll make a little bit more
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sense once we go through all the roles muscles can play.