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Posterior Tibialis Reactive Activation

Posterior Tibialis Reactive Activation is a muscular exercise strategy focused on strengthening the posterior tibialis muscles. The exercise involves isometric contractions of the tibialis posterior muscle, which helps to improve the strength and stability of the arch of the foot and lower leg. This strengthening of the arch helps to reduce arch strain and improve balance and agility when standing and walking, thus reducing the risk of ankle injury. Additionally, Posterior Tibialis Reactive Activ

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This is Brent, President of B2C Fitness,
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and we're doing posterior tibialis
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reactive integration. So, our posterior tibialis is a muscle that has a
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propensity to get weak in our lower body dysfunction; those of you doing the
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overhead squat that's feet turnout, or feet evert, or even knees duck in during
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an overhead squat. I'm assuming, at this point, if we're doing reactive
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integration, we've already done our release techniques, our stretching
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techniques, mobilization techniques when necessary, and we've done our isolated
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activation. So now we're moving on to this reactive integration, which is this
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idea that the posterior tibialis is active, but now we want to try to get it
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firing in a timely manner during activities of, let's say, daily
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living, or sports performance. I'm going to have Salvina come out and help me
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demonstrate this exercise. I'm going to have you step up here, facing that way. First
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things first, your posterior tibialis is a muscle in the deep
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compartment, on the medial side of your calf, so it's going to be deep to your
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calf, and on the inside. It runs down behind your medial malleolus, and then
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underneath your foot. So it is both a plantar flexor, points your
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toe down, as well as an inverter. So, the way we're going to get that active,
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obviously, is plantar flexion and inversion. Our overactive synergists are
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actually our peroneals, as well as our flexor hallucis longus, and our flexor
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digitorum longus. The way we're going to get those overactive synergists out of
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the equation, is by simply inverting and then lifting the toes. Now in this first
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exercise that we're going to do for our posterior tibialis, I'm going to have
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Salvina reach back with her foot, assume a position that's active for her
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posterior tibialis, so that's going to be foot down, toes up, with slight inversion,
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like she's pointing the ball of her foot at the ground. And then, she's just going
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to drop back and try to land softly. So in this case our
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posterior tibialis has to react, and eccentrically decelerate force and
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stabilize. Let's see that one more time. So reach back, foot down, toes up
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good. And in this first progression, since she's stepping back, she can take on as
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much weight with her front leg as she needs to, to ensure that she has good
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form here, that she's only allowing the posterior tibialis to
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accept as much force as it can. So let me see you drop back a little faster
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this time. Alright, so reach back, good. Once we have this down we can go
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ahead and have Salvina turn around. Now, if she steps forward and leaves this
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back leg up, obviously this back leg is not going to be able to take on as much
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force, so her posterior tibialis on the side
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that we're landing on is going to be forced to take more. She's still going to
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reach forward, foot down, toes up, and land softly. Nice, good. Let's see that one more
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time. As you can see Salvina's been working on this, she does have lower leg
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dysfunction, but she's been working pretty hard. We're going to go
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ahead and move her to the next progression, which starts with a reach,
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foot down, toes up, but now we're actually going to go ahead and fall off, or do a
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little hop down. So let me see a little hop down to stabilization. Good. You can
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see that's a challenge for her, so we'd stop there. You obviously could go on to
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a higher step, or try a little bit more of a forward bound. So, the
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progressions for posterior tibialis reactive integration, we're going
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to go foot down, toes up, first stepping back with a nice soft landing, then
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stepping forward with a nice soft landing, and then hopping forward and