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Resisted Walking

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Resisted Walking is a form of strength training that uses instability to challenge the body. It involves walking with resistance bands, ankle weights, or weighted vests, to make the exercise more difficult. This resistance activates the surrounding muscles, increases muscle activation, and improves muscular function. Its a great way to improve core strength and stability, coordination, stability, balance, and even endurance all while walking. Not to mention it’s an excellent aerobic workout. Plus, you can do it anywhere

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Transcript

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This is Brent of the Brookbush Institute,
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...blank
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and in this video we're bringing you
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an interesting integrated exercise for
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all of those with lower extremity and
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lumbo pelvic hip complex dysfunction.
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This is resisted walking. I'm going to
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bring Melissa out, and we're going to torture
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her a bit. This is a tough exercise. All
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you guys need is something to wrap
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around your waist. We're going to start
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by setting up on the cable column. So,
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I've seen a lot of creativity used here.
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I think this was originally one of those
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weight belts to attach weights to for
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a resisted pull-up. I've used the
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cuffs that go around elbows for hanging
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leg raises. I've even used thick pull-up
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assist bands hooked to a cable column, just
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so that I can put something around the
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hip joints, or around the pelvis just in
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front of the ASIS here, and get it hooked
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up to a cable column so I can create an
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anterior to posterior force. Now, before we
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start resisted walking, which sounds like,
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"Oh, we're just going to walk and there's
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going to be some resistance," which is all
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well and good. But we don't want to
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reinforce compensation patterns, we want
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to improve patterns. When we do
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integrated exercise, what we're trying to
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integrate is the muscles we had
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previously assessed as underactive. In
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the lower extremity, that tends to be the
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glute complex, the medial stabilizers of
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the knee, and my inverters. Alright, so
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here's what it's going to look like.
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First things first, I'm going to have
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Melissa get into a little bit of a
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quarter squat position here, so we got a
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little bend of the knee, and I want her
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to drive through whichever leg is going
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to end up in the back here, squeeze her
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glute, lock her knee, and push off from the
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ball of her foot. Let me see that. Boom, push.
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Alright, like she's trying to take off, like
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she's going to sprint. Let's see one
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more step. Good. You can see nice
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squeezed glute, right, her knee's locked,
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and she's up on the ball of her foot.
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Back nice and slow. Now, if you're on a
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cable column, you're going to have to
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keep this to like two steps
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and then switch legs. An advantage
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to the cable column is that eccentric
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loading is also very difficult and maybe
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beneficial unto itself. Let's see the
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other leg. Good, nice and slow on the way
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back. Whoo, nice and slow. Alright, so
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let's talk about some cues that I use
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often with this. So, the first
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thing I want to make sure Melissa does
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is that she doesn't do this. Just
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walk. Right, I see this a lot with
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resisted walking, which drives me nuts.
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People hook their heal in and then
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pull with their hamstring. Yeah, great
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athletes, great movers don't pull, they
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push. If she pulls, you can think about
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how that might reinforce
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synergistic dominance of her hamstrings
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over her glute max. As opposed to pushing,
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which is going to be her very first cue
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to get that glute drive, so that she gets
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a much more efficient movement pattern.
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Just think of how much larger your
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glutes are than your spindly little
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hamstrings. Alright, so first things first,
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lean forward a little bit and then push
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by squeezing the glutes. Alright, so we
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lean forward a little bit to load the
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glutes and then push to squeeze the
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glutes. If I couldn't get that to happen
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what I could intentionally do is, maybe,
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add back in, if I hadn't already, some
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glute max activation exercises. Maybe
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even add some bridges during her core
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integration exercises, so that when she
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got to this exercise in her movement
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prep, or her warm-up or her rehab routine,
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her glutes were ready to go. Now the next
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thing we might see is she goes ahead and
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steps forward, but this time she doesn't
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walk out her knee. Well, maybe now what
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I'm thinking is, okay we still have a lot
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of synergistic dominance from the from
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the hamstring and they don't want to let her
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fully extend through the knee, or maybe
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she's a little weak in her medial
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stabilizers. I'm going to go ahead and
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cue or to, "Ok, this time when you step
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forward, I want you to lock your knee. You
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have to squeeze your glute and lock your knee
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out." Good.
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And even if I have to do it one step at
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a time initially, okay step back, start
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over again. Let's do it again. Even if I
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have to do that to get her to
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really learn how to step and lock out,
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that's what I'm going to do. Again, if I
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hadn't already put it in her program, I
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could use something like a TKE, a
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terminal knee extension exercise,
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or tibial internal rotator activation, and
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start working on those medial
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stabilizers of the knee to get them
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strong enough to get her to lock out.
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Alright, the next thing I see a lot of is
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somebody will push but leave their heel
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on the floor. I see a lot of that. How
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are you going to get a good step off, a
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good bounce, if your heel-- you just
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just left a joint out when you did
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that. Right, you just left out your ankle.
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I'm not going to move my ankle today.
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That's not a good thing. We have a lot of
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people who have ankle dysfunction. We
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need to make sure they integrate their
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ankle, and if you've been using tibialis
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posterior activation, then all of these
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cues will already be set up. This is one
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of the reasons why I preach, "It's
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important to fix the pieces before you
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try to assemble the puzzle." In
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other words, I believe you have to
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activate individual muscles before you
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try to integrate new movement patterns.
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One of the reasons is because it sets up
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all of our teaching cues. So, you remember
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your tibialis posterior activation? Good.
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So, toes up, push through the ball of your
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foot. I want you to kind of, like- yeah,
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press off. Good, oh good, and back a little
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bit. She's getting more and more powerful.
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She's pulling more and more on
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the cable. This is really good. So you
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guys can see how we're starting to integrate
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all that in. And the last trick I'm going
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to show you is you'll get those people
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who collapse into their step. Right, they
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try to take a step and they do this sort
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of thing, also known as a positive
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Trendelenburg sign. It's the collapse of
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that pelvis, also known as gluteus
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medias weakness. So, of course, I could
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integrate back in gluteus medius
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activation and see if that fixes the
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problem. A little additional cue I can give
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you is rather than have somebody step
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straight out,
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you could have them step out this way,
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which is going to integrate a little bit
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of abduction which is going to force
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their gluteus medius to fire. So, let's
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try that. Right, and the next step. So
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this isn't quite the waltz step that we
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see in sidestepping. We're not
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quite doing this, we're just doing a
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little bit of abduction, just a little
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bit of a little of a wide shuffle or
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wider shuffle than our normal walk to
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make sure we're getting good gluteus
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medius activation. And from here, let's
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say I've set all of that up, then I can get
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even more torturous. Now, I'm not going to
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be able to show you how much I would do,
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because of the width of this camera
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angle. But what I really like to do is
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take somebody off the cable column, use
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something like a pull-up assist band, and we
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end up setting up something that looks
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like we're training for the Iditarod.
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Maybe that's not a joke you want to use with
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your patients, some people do not like to
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be referred to as huskies. But, nonetheless,
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I think if you guys wrap your wrists
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around a band like this,
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you've done a
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good job cueing up to this point, you
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guys can set up a pretty significant
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distance. Okay, we're going to do
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resisted walking for the next 50 feet.
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Good, take another step. Good, take
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another step. And now she gets that
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nice, repetitive being able to work on it-
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you can go ahead and relax. She can work on
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one step after another after another
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after another, rather than
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the somewhat disjunct of having to take a
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step and then come back. Right, so we can
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progress from working on all of our cues
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individually joint, joint by joint, segment by
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segment, and then go, "Okay, let's really
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try to get more transference out of this
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exercise by having you do it 20 times in
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a row, 40 times in a row, 50 times in a
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row. Let's have you do this for a hundred
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feet." Guys, I hope you enjoy this exercise.
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I hope you have some fun with you
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patients and clients. I look forward to
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talking to you soon.