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Teres Major and Latissimus Dorsi SA Static Release

The Teres Major and Latissimus Dorsi Static Release is an exercise that allows for relief of tension and tightness of the shoulder and upper back muscles. During this release, a band or band-like device is placed in the affected area, and the participant holds the end of the band in the affected area. While doing this exercise, the individual holds the band in a static position for 10 seconds, then releases the tension by melting away from the band for an equal amount of time

Transcript

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This is Brent, President of B2C Fitness and
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we're talking about more static
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self-administered release techniques. This time we're going to get a little
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bit more accurate with a technique that's very common.
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Usually this was referred to as a latissimus dorsi static release technique
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with a foam roll. We're actually going to call it a teres major static release
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technique, and I'm going to show you how to be a little bit more specific if
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you do have latissimus dorsi trigger points. I'm going to have my friend, Laura,
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come out and help me out here. First, just a little anatomy lesson. So, when we do
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this technique, and you will see in just in a second, she's going to be on her side
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foam rolling the lateral portion of her scapula, her shoulder blade. Now, your lat,
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however, runs primarily on your back, from thoracolumbar fascia, all the
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way up into the front part of your humerus. There is a small insertion here
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at the bottom angle of the scapula, but if we're doing this lateral border, the
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biggest tissue, the most tissue that we affect is probably to be the teres major.
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Now, that's not a problem. The teres major is also indicated as short and tight in
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our predictive models of upper-body dysfunction. So, whether you're doing
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teres major, or lat, as far as affecting posture, affecting movement,
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improving the quality of our movement, you're still a good shape either way,
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however, we might need to add another technique to ensure that we're getting
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the primary point of which we're going to get latissimus dorsi
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trigger points, which is going to be right in the middle of that belly of that
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muscle, just below the inferior angles of the scapula. So, I'm going to have Laura here
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get into a better position. She's just going to lay on her side in a comfortable
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position, usually knees bent so you're nice and stable. She's going to get that
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foam roll right underneath her scapula there. Good. She's then going to
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roll along the entire border of her scapula and look for the most tender point.
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-Got it! Alright, once she has, it once she's found that point, I'm going to make sure she's
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relaxed, so her legs are relaxed, she's using this arm which is the arm she's
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not foam rolling to stabilize herself. This arm should be limp. We don't want
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this muscle active, because that will definitely cause muscle guarding. That
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will definitely cause that muscle to contract, and then we won't be able to release
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that trigger point. Now, she's going to hold that position for 30 seconds to 2
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minutes, or until she gets a release. Don't roll back and forth, you're just
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going to excite those pain receptors, possibly make trigger points worse. We
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want to make sure we hold on that most sensitive point until it goes away. Now,
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like I said, this is teres major, an internal rotator, also a tight muscle, but
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lats are indicated too, so we need something a little bit more specific for
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her latissimus dorsi. I'm sure you have done this technique as well. I'm
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going to have a roll over on her back, she's going to
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put her hands behind her head, she's going to keep her butt on the ground. Make
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sure she stays drawn-in. She's going to go up and down the length of her
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thoracic spine there. Now, you could have trigger points in your rhomboids and
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those little muscles right around the thoracic spine that might cause some
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pain, but what we're looking for right now is specifically those trigger points
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that are going to be lateral to her spine, just underneath her scapula.
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She's found them. Hopefully she's not guarding, you want to make sure people
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can still breathe. If you need to you can put a medicine ball underneath their
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head for support, just so that they don't have so much pressure back over the
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foam roll, and once again, she's going to hold this position for 30 seconds to 2
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minutes, or until she feels a release, a reduction in discomfort, in those trigger
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points. So there you go, that's the static release techniques for both the
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teres major, as well as a more accurate way to do our latissimus dorsi