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Tuesday, June 6, 2023

The Best Personal Training Certification?

The Best Personal Training Certification?
Brent Brookbush

Brent Brookbush

DPT, PT, MS, CPT, HMS, IMT

The Best Personal Training Certification?

What would the ideal Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) Certification look like?

By Dr. Brent Brookbush, DPT, PT, MS, CPT, HMS, IMT

The Best CPT Certification Needs to be Better!

There are so many problems with the personal training certifications on the market - from high prices, to poorly taught (or boring) exercise science courses, mis-leading and/or incorrect information, completion dependent on large inflexible time commitments, formats that prevent learning on the go (e.g. giant textbooks), hidden fees (e.g. additional costs for practice exams), post-purchase costs (e.g. certification exam retake fees), paying again for redundant material labeled as advanced credentials (e.g. specialty certifications), being expected to keep records and save certificates for recertification, poorly designed and hard to navigate websites, etc... All of this must make fitness professionals feel like they are trying to choose the right personal trainer certification by selecting the least bad option.

Note, this is not an exhaustive list of issues with personal training certifications, nor does it apply to only a couple of fitness certifications... These are just some of the issues that are the standard offering of most personal training certifications (and specialty certifications) in the fitness industry (e.g. ACE personal trainer certification, ISSA personal trainer certification, NASM personal trainer certification, NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Cooper Institute certified personal fitness trainer certification, etc.).

We know our colleagues in the fitness industry are just looking for affordable, evidence-based, applied personal training education they can use with clients tomorrow. Studying for the certification should be easily accessible, flexible, and convenient enough to fit into everyone's busy work/life schedule. Ideally, the information would be delivered in a way that made studying maximally effective and enjoyable, with unparalleled care to optimize study materials and certification exams.

Note, we know group fitness instructors are facing the same issues with group fitness education. We hope this article can inspire new ideas for an innovative group fitness certification company. Although the Brookbush Institute does not offer group fitness certifications, we are approved to offer group fitness instructors continuing education credits (CECs) and would be happy to lend our expertise.

Summary of Needed Innovations

  • $450.00 - $2000.00 for a Personal Training Certification is CRAZY: Initial investment in a certified personal trainer certification (CPT) should be low to reduce the barriers of entry for a more socioeconomically diverse population, and initial investment and return policies should allow students the chance to review materials with little or no financial risk. The overall price should be affordable to promote re-investment in the lifelong learning of exercise science, and the acquisition of additional credentials.
  • No Hidden Fees: Hidden fees have to go! You can find out more about the fees that a variety of certification programs are hiding by checking out - How Much Does a Personal Training Certification Cost (Including Hidden Fees)?
  • Stop with the Double, Triple, or Quadruple Billing: Repackaging the same content with a different label has to stop. Too many continuing education courses, additional certifications, and advanced credentials are built on information that was already purchased as part of a primary credential (usually a Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) Certification. Billing a premium rate for redundant information with a coveted label is just unethical behavior.
  • Convenient, Accessible, and Flexible: Move over Amazon.com, move over Netflix.com... you want it easy, affordable, enjoyable, and in the palm of your hand, look to personal training certifications for none-of-that. The world has changed and certification programs need to catch up. Education should be easily accessible via desktop (laptop) or mobile device (phone), easy to start and stop, and consumable in smaller chunks.
  • Accredited/Peer-reviewed: To ensure minimum standards of education quality, personal training certification providers should complete 3rd party, systematic and objective peer-review by subject matter experts, under the supervision of a national council developed for competency assurance (comprehensive peer-review). Unfortunately, this is not the standard in the industry. While this is part of the stringent requirements necessary to pass learning review and approval by the American Council on Education (ACE) , it is not part of the most popular accreditation, the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) . For more on this topic, check out - What is a Fully Accredited Personal Trainer Certification?
  • Employment Opportunities: Having "CPT" (Certified Personal Trainer) after your name should increase the chance of, or provide opportunities for employment. A few organizations actively seek partnerships to help the professionals they certify attain interviews. The Brookbush Institute has established relationships with Lifetime , Goodlife, Orange Theory, and US Fitness, just to name a few.
  • It Must be Evidenced-based (Accurate): Too many certifications base their content on the thoughts of one or a few individuals (high potential for bias), make half-hearted attempts at citing their work (cherry-picked citations), or their content is woefully out-of-date and far from comprehensive. Evidence-based practice is the only way to RELIABLY achieve the HIGHEST levels of content accuracy.
  • It Has to be Practical: Having a strong scientific foundation is important for any scientific profession, but personal training certifications need to focus on the scientific information that correlates with being a better personal trainer. Several certifications on the market do a good job at making you smarter, but the number of exercises, exercise progressions/regressions, routines, and programming examples in the majority of certifications is embarrassingly small.
  • Student-centered Learning: It is crazy to charge someone a fortune, to force them to learn from a poorly written text, only have that one learning format available, and give them zero choices over the subjects they want to learn, to prepare for a ridiculous summative exam. Education research opposes these practices. Educators should work to remove as many obstacles as possible from the learning experience, ideally using advanced instructional design and technology, to integrate choice, multiple learning formats, iterative testing, etc., to provide a far more effective and enjoyable education experience.
  • End Summative Final Exams: Enough with the fear-inducing, cram-and-forget inspiring, single-shot to pass-or-fail, final exams. We have to end summative final exams and replace them with iterative testing and benchmarks based on progress through coursework. We must find ways to assess ability while motivating students to learn more.
  • Re-certification Requirements: In theory, re-certification is a wonderful idea, to ensure professionals continue their education. In practice, re-certification has become a clumsy, cumbersome, rubber stamp on pretty horrible course offerings, after payment of an unapologetic money grab. Recertification should be iterative, automatic, and affordable.

For Additional Resources on Certification and Accreditation:

Friends admire their colleagues new Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) Certification posted to their online account.
Caption: Friends admire their colleagues new Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) Certification posted to their online account.

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Building the Dream Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) Certification

When the Brookbush Institute launched our Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) certification, we tried to completely disrupt how this credential is offered. We started with the question, "As a working professional and busy human being (family, school, exercise/sports, etc.), looking to change careers or increase my employment opportunities, what would the "perfect certification" look like to me?

$450.00 - $2000.00 for a Personal Training Certification is CRAZY

The first issue that must be addressed is price. Many certifications are little more than a textbook and exam, with approval from some recognized quality assurance organization. However, most certifications are priced as if they are a multi-credit college course with dozens of hours of live instruction to bill for. Now, we have given business lectures and stated "a program that is not profitable is not sustainable". But, the profit margin on many of these certifications is less about sustainability and progress, and far more about obfuscation and greed.

It may be idealistic, but as educators, we believe the initial investment should be low to reduce the barriers of entry for a more socioeconomically diverse population, initial investment and return policies should also allow students the chance to review materials with little or no financial risk, and the overall price should be affordable to promote re-investment in lifelong learning. The goal should be to aid practitioners in beginning and continuing careers, integrate more talented professionals, and contribute to the advancement of the field overall. In short, we need to replace short-term profit strategies, with long-term thinking.

Unfortunately, the price of personal training certifications has continued to increase for at least the last two decades, and the increases have been compounded and obscured by a dizzying assortment of hidden costs and post-purchase fees. For more, check out this article - How Much Does a Personal Training Certification Cost (Including Hidden Fees)?

Another unethical practice is the repackaging of content with a coveted (trendy) label. Too many continuing education courses, additional certifications, and advanced credentials are built on information that was already purchased as part of a primary credential (usually a Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) Certification). Billing a premium rate for redundant information with a coveted label is just unethical, and we can point to examples of this issue in at least half of the most recognized certification providers.

Our solution is, "if Netflix can do it, so can we." The Brookbush Institute CPT certification is included in a low-price, monthly membership (19.99/month), with a 30-day money-back guarantee, and no additional fees. No fee for additional study materials, no fee for the app, no exam re-take fee, no re-certification fee, no additional fee for CECs, no additional fee for advanced credentials, etc... Just a simple, affordable monthly membership, you can cancel at any time. We even have a yearly membership that reduces the average cost per month. Although this business model is deceptively complex, we believe it is the right thing to do. It places pressure on the business to continually improve the product to retain members, rather than placing pressure on the business to increase profit margins by reducing the quality of a product that is only sold once.

It Needs to be Convenient and Accessible on the Go

It often feels like education is where customer service, convenience, flexibility, and access went to die. Move over Amazon.com, move over Netflix.com... you want it easy, affordable, enjoyable, and in the palm of your hand, look to education for none-of-that. The world has changed and education needs to catch up. Education should be easily accessible via desktop (laptop) or mobile device (phone), should be easy to start and stop, and should be consumable in smaller chunks. Working professionals are busy people, and that's what the Brookbush Institute builds for. We completely re-imagined education content delivery, to make it possible to fit education into the schedule of a busy, working individual. When we picture someone taking our courses, we imagine the working professional who just had a cancellation, is in-between appointments, is on a commute, or is on a lunch break... they whip out their phone or laptop, knock out another credit or two, or at least "favorite" and "bookmark" another course, and are an hour closer to completion.

This is only possible because we did away with the giant (most often outdated) textbook and summative exam format, and replaced it with short courses (1 - 4 credit/hours long), with short exams, certification built on a credit system, and made it available online (website and mobile app). With the Brookbush Institute you can knock out a course in a single study session (or maybe a couple of sessions), pass a short final exam (7-15 questions), get your credits, and that content is complete. You do not need to return to it in preparation for some ridiculous single-shot, pass-or-fail, summative exam. With us, if you earn credit, you keep the credit, and you are closer to completing your certification. There is no back-breaking final exam waiting for you, and no time limits on certification completion (more on the issues with summative exams below).

Accredited/Peer-Reviewed

To ensure minimum standards of education quality, personal training certification providers should complete 3rd party, systematic and objective peer-review by subject matter experts, under the supervision of a national council developed for competency assurance (comprehensive peer-review). Unfortunately, this is not the standard in the industry. While this is part of the stringent requirements necessary to pass learning review and approval by the American Council on Education (ACE) , it is not part of the most popular accreditation, the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) . The only thing NCCA accreditation signifies is the use of NCCA test creation processes. The NCCA accreditation does not include an expert peer-review of a certification's content, which should be enough to dismiss this accreditation as relevant  in any scientific field. Any company claiming they are "fully accredited" based on NCCA accreditation, is being disingenuous at best. Ideally, the industry would adopt American Council on Education (ACE) approval or approval by a similar organization. An alternative demonstration of content quality may be a certification's approval as continuing education credits for select professional organizations (e.g. NATA, AOTA, AusActive, TPTA, etc.) whose application process includes peer-review of courses.

The Proud and Very Few:

As far as we know, there are only 2 personal training certifications in the industry that have been approved following a comprehensive, systematic review, by a panel of 3rd party, subject matter experts (peer-review), and whose learning objectives have been matched to the post-secondary education curriculum and/or professionals skills and competencies:

Three of the largest certification providers fall into a weird in-between category of being NCCA accredited (not peer-reviewed), and including content within their certification that has been peer-reviewed. That is, the personal training certification unto itself has not undergone comprehensive peer-review, but some of the included content has been peer-reviewed.

  • International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA): Curriculum Review by Distance Education Accrediting Commission (DEAC)
  • American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM): Publication of a peer-reviewed scientific journal - Medicine, and Science in Sports and Exercise
  • National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA): Publication of a peer-reviewed scientific journal - The Strength and Conditioning Journal

Unfortunately, most of the largest certifying organizations are offering CPT certifications that have not undergone comprehensive peer review. The following organizations should seriously consider replacing their questionable NCCA accreditation , with a quality assurance organization that includes comprehensive peer-review.

  • National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)
  • American Council on Exercise (ACE)
  • Copper Institute (Recently merged with the American Council of Exercise)
  • National Exercise and Sports Trainers Association (NESTA)
  • National Fitness Professionals Association (NFPA)

Note, we know you might be thinking that the Brookbush Institute is biased and that we are promoting the accreditation we have acquired. Although we are biased toward our efforts to enhance education and have a certain portfolio of accreditations, it is also true that we sought out American Council of Education approval , after a thorough review of our accreditation options. ACE approval was a process that took well over a year, but we felt it was the "right thing to do", to ensure the continued advancement of the industry.

Employment Opportunities:

A Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) certification should increase the chances of employment or career advancement. However, this is largely determined by whether an employer prefers a particular CPT certification. Fact, there are no laws in the USA or Canada that prevent a person from being a personal trainer, whether they are certified or not. A certification alone, cannot change someone's scope of practice (licensure changes scope). The fitness industry is self-regulated. In some cases, an employer's liability insurance provider will demand a professional is certified (or in the process of certification) for coverage in case of an incident; however, which certification is generally not stated by the insurance provider. Every certification we have mentioned is widely respected and recognized in the industry, but gyms have their preferences. If you call a gym, and they do not accept the certification you have or the certification you are working on, just try a different gym.

  • Pro Tips: If you have a preferred employer before being certified, we always recommend reaching out to that employer and asking about their preferences. Further, if you have a certification from a certifying organization other than your preferred employer's preference, you may ask if your current certification makes you eligible for an interview, and let them know you are more than willing to add their preferred credential to your portfolio if you are hired.

List of the Most Widely Recognized and Respected Certification Providers

  • Brookbush Institute
  • World Instructor Training Schools (WITS)
  • International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA)
  • American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
  • National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)
  • National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)
  • American Council on Exercise (ACE)
  • National Exercise and Sports Trainers Association (NESTA)
  • National Fitness Professionals Association (NFPA)

The Future: We believe that technology is beginning to create another, more beneficial employment option for certified personal trainers. Social media has demonstrated how effective technology is for bringing people together. A new generation of training certifications will include partnerships between certifying companies and personal trainer employers, to help professionals find and attain interviews and jobs. The Brookbush Institute has established relationships with Lifetime, Goodlife, Orange Theory, US Fitness, etc., and continues to build relationships to help develop ideas that will match employers and professionals, guarantee interviews, offer reimbursements for education costs, attain raises for the completion of advanced credentials, monitor continuing education, etc.

It Must be Evidence-based (Accurate):

Evidence-based practice should be the standard for the fitness industry. Too many certification base their content on the thoughts of one or a few individuals (high potential for bias) make half-hearted attempts at citing their work (cherry-picked citations), or their content is woefully out-of-date and far from comprehensive. Several certifications started on a path toward evidence-based practice, but no certification seems to have continued the effort. And, all certifications who have made attempts to become evidence-based, charge more than $700 for certification. (Except for the Brookbush Institute )

As educators, the goal of developing evidence-based content is to ensure ACCURACY. We want to prevent our colleagues from experiencing that sickening feeling that comes from finding out you spent hours, days, or months, studying incorrect information. We could easily start pointing to certifications with misprinted origins and insertions for muscles, acute variables tables that are outdated and inaccurate, references to lower abs, spot reduction, toning, and other myths, and more academic points about research quality that are completely wrong. However, the larger point is that many of these errors would fade away if certification providers would build systems for producing and updating certifications based on research and outcomes (note, this topic is also related to "Accreditation/Peer-review" discussed above). Evidence-based practice is the only way to RELIABLY achieve the HIGHEST levels of content accuracy.

Over the last 10 years, the Brookbush Institute has created potentially the most rigorous and transparent processes for evidence-based content development in the industry, to develop all courses from a comprehensive systematic review of all relevant original research (and as mentioned above, we only charge 19.99/month). We want to be the resource you know you can trust... not because of "faith in a genius founder", but because of peerless scientific rigor and processes. We believe our colleagues deserve the most accurate information available, because certification is not the goal, helping our colleagues achieve success with their clients is the goal... and that is hard to do with inaccurate information.

It has to be practical:

Having a strong scientific foundation is important for any scientific profession, but physiology, even exercise physiology, is a broad topic. Personal training certification needs to focus on the scientific information that correlates with being a better personal trainer. Several certifications on the market do a good job at making you smarter, but it would be hard to use their content to be a "better personal trainer". For example, a couple of CPT certifications spend a large amount of time discussing the effects of exercise on short-term increases in post-exercise blood hormone concentrations; however, the research demonstrates that these changes in hormone concentrations likely have little, if any, effect on long-term outcomes. Personal trainers teach people to exercise, but the number of exercises, exercise progressions/regressions, routines, and programming examples in the majority of certifications is embarrassingly small.

At the end of the day, the only thing a client cares about is the outcome, and those outcomes are dependent on exercise (not lectures on hormone levels). Certifications should start with the intent of providing information that can be "used with clients on Monday morning," and then teach the science that resulted in the development of those suggestions. Every Brookbush Institute course is a practical course or a foundational course for a practical course, and the gross majority of courses include videos of related exercises, interventions, and techniques.

Dr. Brent Brookbush teaches about the hamstrings (biceps femoris), during a class "Introduction to Functional Anatomy"
Caption: Dr. Brent Brookbush teaches about the hamstrings (biceps femoris), during a class "Introduction to Functional Anatomy"

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Student-centered learning:

Every effort should be made by the educator to remove every obstacle in the way of effective learning. The industry standard of "I had it hard, so you are going to have it hard", or "these obstacles separate (or sort) the wheat from the chaff" are potentially the most damaging beliefs in the education industry. It is crazy to charge someone a fortune, to force them to learn from a poorly written text, only have that one learning format available, and give them zero choices over the subjects they want to know, to prepare for a ridiculously scary, giant, pass or fail, "single-shot on goal" exam. And, our industry has seemingly double-downed on this torturous methodology, by making you do it again for any additional credentials (often rehashing much of the same content). Potentially, the saddest part of this practice is research on adult learning, which opposes it. And, the literature is full of great ideas for better instructional methods. This is our industry's horse-drawn carriage when the rest of the world wants a Tesla.

The Brookbush Institute has tried to remove as many obstacles as we can, and use advanced instructional design and technology to provide a far more effective and enjoyable education experience. This includes switching to the short course, iterative testing, and credit system described above. That credit system allows the student some choice over which content they want to complete. We have carefully designed our courses with clarity, organization, and succinct learning objectives, to ensure an easy-to-follow, comprehensive educational offering, that replaces confusion with comprehension and application. We have added "Audible-like" voice-overs to text, video lectures and video demonstrations to nearly all courses, captions and written instructions to videos, a pop-up glossary, hyperlinks to related text, written research reviews, etc. We know the goal of offering multiple media formats is not that one is superior (contrary to popular belief), but that the student wants choices and may learn better from engaging with multiple formats, and some formats are just better for certain types of content. For example, illustrations may be ideal for learning anatomy, videos ideal for exercise demonstrations, and text ideal for research reviews. Learning anatomy from a video of an instructor teaching alone would be challenging, a picture of an exercise is not as helpful as a video, and trying to search a video for the research you need in a systematic review would be horrifically frustrating.

We also continue to improve the website and mobile app, ensuring it is easy to find courses, take practice exams and final exams, track progress and return to courses on the go, achieve certifications, and additional certifications, keep track of CECs, and even re-certification with BI is different. The only challenge any student should face is the enjoyment of conquering complex topics. As educators our focus should be on making 100% of a student's effort directed toward learning, not attempting to navigate some poorly designed process.

Summative Final Exams are Bullshit!!!

As an educator, there are very few instances I can recommend a large, summative final exam. Perhaps, the only time these exams are necessary is when a minimum education standard is necessary to perform a task, but attaining that minimum education can be achieved through multiple programs. For example, a licensure exam to enter a medical profession following an education that could be attained from dozens or 100s of different university programs. In almost all other cases these exams should be avoided. Summative final exams promote "cram and forget learning" and demotivate students. This is the opposite of what we should be promoting. Educators should be promoting mastery via a habit of enjoyable learning, incremental improvement, and repetition. A Ted Talk by Sal Khan presents this concept beautifully - Let's teach for mastery -- not test scores .

Another large problem with fear-inducing, cram and forget inspiring, single-shot to pass-or-fail, final exams, is that most certifying organizations do not know how to write a good exam. That is an exam that is sensitive, specific, and reliable as an assessment of retention, comprehension, and application of job-specific skills. How many times have you taken an exam that had several questions that you thought were unfair; perhaps hard to understand because of grammatical issues, seemed to test knowledge of random facts and details that did not pertain to practice, or the test was so long it was a better assessment of mental endurance? These are all examples of poor test creation. Ideally, tests would be more than a fair assessment of your ability to perform a task; they would also contribute to the learning process. A great exam is specific, sensitive, and reliable, and leaves the student feeling like they learned something from taking the test.

As an industry, we have to end summative final exams and replace them with iterative testing and benchmarks based on progress through course work. We must find a way to assess ability while motivating students to learn more. The Brookbush Institute curriculum is built from a library of 1-4 credit courses (1 credit is approximately 1 hour of study), each with a short final exam (1 credit course = 7 questions, 2c = 10q, 3c =15q, 4c = 20q), practice exams are available for every course to aid in determining readiness, and credits are instantaneously awarded for each passed final exam. You never lose credits, you can attain credits at your own pace, (CEC certificates are provided for each course ), and when you achieve enough credits you are certified. No summative final exam. And, all of these exams are included in membership, with no additional costs. The crazy part about this approach is that our certified professionals have higher pass rates, having answered a larger number of more challenging questions, and most go on to complete more courses and exams after they are certified. It is amazing how much more willing we all are to face a challenge, when that challenge is just 7, 10, or 15 questions... and not a grueling 2-hour+ session of 100+ questions, that seems to be holding our future in the balance. We receive testimonials regularly telling us how challenging our exams are, but that despite their fear and problems taking exams, they can take pride in ALL of the exams they have passed with our courses. Many have gone back to school (B.S., M.S, and Doctoral programs), having conquered their fear of exams.

Back to Price: Because we refuse to add "cram and forget inspiring" summative exams, proctored at a testing center, as mandated by NCCA accreditation , we do not have to charge per exam, we do not have to charge for an exam retake fees, exam rescheduling, exam extensions, etc. This is just one way that NCCA accreditation is standing in the way of the advancement of education, and adding substantial costs for students. Amazing how a better-educated decision could reduce costs, and all we have to do is push for NCCA accreditation from the industry.

Disrupting Re-certification:

In theory, re-certification is a wonderful idea, to ensure professionals continue their education, and stay "up-to-date" with the scientific advancement in their field. Generally, certifying organizations require about 10 hours of continued education per year, with the standard being 20 hours per 2-year cycle. In practice, re-certification has become a clumsy, cumbersome, rubber stamp on pretty horrible course offerings, after payment of an unapologetic money-grab. True story, the last time I "re-certified" with an organization it took me 15 minutes to figure out where to submit my certificates, 30-minutes to upload my certificates into their ridiculously slow website, only to find out I had submitted my certificates into the wrong fields (thanks in large part to a horrible user interface). I then had to start over, and 75 minutes after I had started, I was thanked for my effort with a request for $150.00. WTF?

There is a better way: Recertification with the Brookbush Institute is iterative, automatic, and included in membership, with no additional fees. Certifications with the Brookbush Institute will expire 2-years from the date of the last course you took within a 2-year period that included 20 credits. That sounds a little confusing, but what we are saying is that we will automatically extend the expiration date of your certification by 2-years from the date of your last course; as long as the previous 2-year period includes at least 20 credits. And, this happens automatically. You can extend your certification expiration date incrementally, indefinitely, by finishing a course a month, or a couple of courses a quarter, and/or by starting your next certification with the Brookbush Institute. Re-certification with the Brookbush Institute is as easy as adding a few more credits to your account. And, this is all included in membership, with no additional fees!

"The Brookbush Institute has given me the ability to truly understand corrective exercise.  Before being involved with the Brookbush Institute, I was certified as a Corrective Exercise Specialist, but memorized things to pass more than understood the science-based rationale behind the workout recommendations. Since being involved with the Brookbush Institute, I now have the clarity, confidence, professionalism, and rationale backed by science-based research to deliver fitness programs that make sense and deliver results.  The Brookbush Institute is a resource that is utilized even after becoming officially certified.  With the research articles, videos, and evolving educational material, it is worth having to assist in not only continuing education, but also to add more content and tools for training programs.  I am extremely grateful for how the Brookbush Institute has assisted in my growth as fitness professional and contributor to the fitness industry."  Jerod Langness, Team Development Manager, Life Time Academy Lab Instructor
Caption: "The Brookbush Institute has given me the ability to truly understand corrective exercise.  Before being involved with the Brookbush Institute, I was certified as a Corrective Exercise Specialist, but memorized things to pass more than understood the science-based rationale behind the workout recommendations. Since being involved with the Brookbush Institute, I now have the clarity, confidence, professionalism, and rationale backed by science-based research to deliver fitness programs that make sense and deliver results.  The Brookbush Institute is a resource that is utilized even after becoming officially certified.  With the research articles, videos, and evolving educational material, it is worth having to assist in not only continuing education, but also to add more content and tools for training programs.  I am extremely grateful for how the Brookbush Institute has assisted in my growth as fitness professional and contributor to the fitness industry." Jerod Langness, Team Development Manager, Life Time Academy Lab Instructor

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"The Brookbush Institute has given me the ability to truly understand the corrective exercise. Before being involved with the Brookbush Institute, I was certified as a Corrective Exercise Specialist but memorized things to pass more than understanding the science-based rationale behind the workout recommendations. Since being involved with the Brookbush Institute, I now have the clarity, confidence, professionalism, and rationale backed by science-based research to deliver fitness programs that make sense and deliver results. The Brookbush Institute is a resource that is utilized even after becoming officially certified. With the research articles, videos, and evolving educational material, it is worth having to assist in not only continuing education but also adding more content and tools for training programs. I am extremely grateful for how the Brookbush Institute has assisted in my growth as a fitness professional and contributor to the fitness industry."

  • Jerod Langness, Team Development Manager, Life Time Academy Lab Instructor

© 2022 Brent Brookbush (B2C Fitness, LLC d.b.a. Brookbush Institute)

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