Biceps Brachii, Brachialis and Triceps Brachii (Brachioradialis and Coracobrachialis)

by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Lesson 11: Arm Muscles

Study GuideQuick Reference - Arms

Note: If you intend to do the activities below do not open the "Study Guide" - all the answers are already filled in.  The study guide is just a quick reference tool, similar to flash cards - great for preparing for an exam.

Introduction:

In this lecture we will be discussing the muscles of the arm: Biceps brachii, brachialis, triceps, brachioradialis and coracobrachialis:

Etymology:

  • Biceps - biceps 1630s (adj.), from Latin biceps "having two parts," literally "two-headed," from bis "double" (see bis-) + -ceps comb. form of caput "head" (see capitulum). As a noun meaning "biceps muscle," from 1640s, so called for its structure. Despite the -s, it is singular, and classicists insist there is no such word as bicep. (Etymology Online)
  • Brachio - brachio- before a vowel, brachi-, word-forming element meaning "arm," from Greek brakhion "arm," perhaps originally "upper arm," literally "shorter," and from brakhys "short" (see brief (adj.)), in contrast to the longer forearm. (Etymology Online)
  • Tricepstriceps (n.) the great extensor muscle, 1704, from Latin triceps "three-headed," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + -ceps, from caput "head" (see capitulum). So called because the muscle has three origins. (Etymology Online)
  • Radialisradial (adj.) c.1400, "of or like a ray or radius," from Medieval Latin radialis, from Latin radius "shaft, rod; spoke of a wheel; beam of light" (see radius). As a noun, a type of tire, attested from 1965, short for radial-ply